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CT
CT Coronary Calcium Scoring
Ultrasound
MRI
X-ray
X-ray
 
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Registration and Insurance Notice
   
  About Your Visit
   
  To schedule your appointment with us, please call 310.914.7336, extension 2 for imaging procedures, and 310.914.7336, extension 120 for surgical procedures. Please download and print the form on the right for your procedure, complete it, and bring it with you to your appointment. To further help you prepare for your visit, we have provided details about Insurance, Billing, and information about imaging and surgical procedures below.
   
  Insurance
  Landmark Imaging Medical Group, Inc
  YOU MAY NEED PRE-CERTIFICATION FOR YOUR PROCEDURE. There are many different insurance carriers, and each company has many different plans. While some carriers have no pre-certification requirements, many require pre-certification by the insurance carrier prior to the procedure.
   
  If you have any questions regarding pre-certification requirements, please ask at the time of scheduling. You may call us at (310) 914-7336 extension 2. If you have any questions or concerns about your coverage that we cannot answer, you may be directed to your carrier’s Customer Service Department for additional details.
   
  Landmark Imaging Surgical Center, LLC
  Landmark Imaging Surgical Center, LLC accepts Medicare, United Healthcare and some other private insurance. Please call us at (310) 914-7336 extension 120 for more information.
   
Billing
  Our billing company, Medical Specialties Managers, Inc., specializes in radiology billing. If you have any questions regarding the billing of your procedure or your account, please contact Medical Specialties Mangers, Inc. at (888) 598-8820 extension 1. Their billing office hours of operation are 9:00 am-4:00 pm PST Monday through Friday.
   
Imaging Procedures
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)
  Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. MR imaging uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone, and virtually all other internal body structures. The images are then interpreted by a radiologist. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays).
   
  Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate parts of the body and certain diseases that may not be assessed adequately with other imaging methods such as x-ray, ultrasound, or computed tomography (also called CT scanning). Exam Preparations
   
  Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)
  Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) provides detailed images of blood vessels using a powerful magnetic field, radio waves, and a computer. MR angiography does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays).
   
  MR angiography may be performed with or without IV contrast material (not iodine based). Exam Preparations
   
  MR Spectroscopy (Prostate Gland)
  Prostate cancer is the second most common fatal cancer in men. By way of comparison, there are nearly as many new cases of prostate cancer each year as there are new cases of breast cancer in women. In addition, almost as many men die of prostate cancer each year as women die of breast cancer. Accurate staging of prostate cancer is critical to the prognosis and treatment for this disease. MR Spectroscopy of the prostate gland has been shown to improve the accuracy of staging of prostate cancer by MR imaging. Prostate MR Spectroscopy is available only in a few centers in the country at this time. LIMG has state-of-the-art MR imaging equipment as well as post-processing equipment to help stage and diagnose men with prostate cancer with the use of MR imaging and MR Spectroscopy. There are relatively few radiologists in the country who have extensive experience in prostate MR imaging and MR Spectroscopy imaging.
   
  Jeffrey M. Silverman, MD at LIMG has had extensive experience in the interpretation of prostate MR imaging and MR Spectroscopy. He has given many formal lectures on prostate MR imaging, has written articles in the peer-reviewed literature on prostate MR imaging, and teaches other radiologists how to interpret prostate MR scans. Dr. Silverman directs the prostate MR imaging and MR Spectroscopy clinical and research program at LIMG. Exam Preparations
   
  Breast MRI
  MRI of the breast offers valuable information about many breast conditions that may not be able to be obtained by other imaging modalities, such as mammography or ultrasound. Breast MRI can be used to evaluate breast implants, to detect and/or stage breast cancer, and to evaluate breast infection. Exam Preparations
   
  Computed Tomography (CT)
  CT scanning is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. CT imaging uses special x-ray equipment to produce multiple images of the inside of the body and a computer to join them together in cross-sectional views of the area being studied. The images are then interpreted by a radiologist.
   
  CT scans of internal organs, bone, soft tissue, and blood vessels provide greater clarity than conventional x-ray exams. Using specialized equipment and expertise to create and interpret CT scans of the body, radiologists can more easily diagnose problems such as cancers, cardiovascular disease, infectious disease, and musculoskeletal disorders. Exam Preparations
   
  Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA)
  CT angiography (CTA) is a computed tomography study that uses IV contrast material to produce detailed pictures of the blood vessels to detect aneurysms and other vascular abnormalities. CT imaging uses special x-ray equipment to produce multiple images and a computer to join them together in cross-sectional views. Exam Preparations
   
  CT Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring
  A cardiac CT scan is a non-invasive way of obtaining information about the location and extent of calcified plaque in the coronary arteries—the vessels that supply oxygen-containing blood to the heart wall. Plaque is a build-up of fat and other substances, including calcium, which can, over time, narrow the arteries or even close off blood flow to the heart. The result may be chest pain or a heart attack.
   
  Because calcium is a marker of coronary artery disease, the amount of calcium detected on a cardiac CT scan is a helpful diagnostic tool. The findings on cardiac CT are expressed as a calcium score. Exam Preparations
   
  CT Colonography (Virtual Colonoscopy)
CT Colonography uses CT scanning to obtain an interior view of the colon (the large intestine) that is ordinarily only seen with an endoscope inserted into the rectum. Exam Preparations
   
  Ultrasound
Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography, utilizes high-frequency sound waves to produce pictures of the inside of the body. Ultrasound exams do not use ionizing radiation (x-ray). Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels.
   
  Doppler ultrasound is a special ultrasound technique that evaluates blood as it flows through a blood vessel, including the body's major arteries and veins in the abdomen, arms, legs, and neck. Exam Preparations
   
  Plain Film Radiography (X-ray)
An x-ray (radiograph) is a painless medical test that helps physicians diagnose medical conditions. Radiography involves exposing a part of the body to a small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the body. X-rays are the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging. Exam Preparations
     
  Surgical Procedures  
  Epidural Steroid Injections  
  An epidural injection is delivered into the epidural space of the spine to provide temporary or prolonged relief from pain or inflammation. The epidural space is located outside the dural membrane. Steroids, anesthetics and anti-inflammatory medications are typically delivered in an epidural injection. The injection may reduce pain and swelling in and around the spinal nerve roots, as well as around damaged nerves which in time may heal.  
     
  Imaging guidance, such as fluoroscopy or computed tomography (CT), may be used to help the doctor place the needle in exactly the right location so the patient can receive maximum benefit from the injection. Exam Preparations  
     
Myelogram  
  Patients with seizure disorders should consult their doctor prior to having a myelogram procedure. Although seizure is an uncommon complication, certain medications that can lower the threshold for seizures and should be discontinued prior to the myelogram. If you are taking any anti-depressant medications, e.g. Elavil, phenothiazines, MAO-inhibitors, tricyclic anti-depressants, Zyban, anti-psychotic medications, CNS stimulants, muscle relaxants or any other medication that lowers the seizure threshold, please inform your doctor in advance of the procedure. These medications can be stopped 2 days before the procedure and resumed 1 day after the procedure.  
     
  Sympathetic Nerve Block  
  A nerve block is an anesthetic or anti-inflammatory injection targeted toward a certain nerve or group of nerves to treat pain. The purpose of the injection is to "turn off" a pain signal coming from a specific location in the body or to decrease inflammation in that area.  
     
  Imaging guidance, such as fluoroscopy or computed tomography (CT), may be used to help the doctor place the needle in exactly the right location so that the patient can receive maximum benefit from the injection. Exam Preparations  
     
  Vertebroplasty  
  Vertebroplasty is a minimally invasive procedure that strengthens a fractured or broken or vertebra, the small bones that make up the spinal column. When a vertebra fractures, the usual rectangular shape of the bone becomes compressed and distorted, causing pain. These compression fractures, which may involve the collapse of one or more vertebrae in the spine, are a common symptom and result of osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a disease that results in a loss of normal bone density, mass and strength, leading to a condition in which bones are increasingly porous or full or small holes and vulnerable to breaking. Vertebrae can also become weakened by cancer.  
     
  In vertebroplasty, physicians use image guidance to inject a special cement mixture through a needle into the fractured bone. Exam Preparations  
     
     
     

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11620 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 100  |  Los Angeles, CA 90025  |  Main: 310.914.7336 • Fax: 310.914.7326